The costs of work

Employment rates for recent college graduates tend to make news headlines. What we read about less often is how many college students are forced to work while in school because of financial need.

Nearly 60% of college students experiencing food insecurity reported having a paying job, according to a study released last month of over 3,700 students in 12 different states.

These students aren’t just working to earn extra spending money. This data provides more proof that a traditional solution for financing college tuition – getting a job – isn’t sufficiently meeting the needs of millions of students today.

Nationally, over three quarters of college students work while in school. This wasn’t always the case. Between the early 1970s and 2000s, the proportion of students combining school and work more than doubled from 12% to 28%. This is in some part because the proportion of high school graduates going to college jumped from 31% to 55%.

Time is valuable. If students have to work to try and cover their basic needs and sometimes even their family’s needs, that means they have less time and energy for class and studying.

In the past two weeks, CfH leaders at University of Pittsburgh and SUNY Binghamton held campus interviews with a Student Affairs administrator and a University President. The Student Planning Team for the Campus Hunger Project has started to wrap up their outreach work for the semester and plan ahead for the spring.

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