Are we asking the right question?

“No one is counting” refers to the fact that while colleges collect data from students everyday (picture a thick folder of academic transcripts, financial aid forms, etc) one very important question doesn’t get asked: are you struggling to afford or access food?

What data do we collect from college students, particularly students receiving financial aid? Quite a lot.

Every year, the federal government commissions the National Postsecondary Student Aid Survey, which focuses on how students finance their education. Key findings include the socioeconomic backgrounds of students and what percentages of students take out loans and use grants to pay for school.

This survey is the primary source of information used to determine education policy and financial aid programs like the Pell grant. This is why there are serious, potential policy implications for not including a single question about food insecurity. Last summer, the Wisconsin HOPE Lab and American Council on Education Center for Policy Research and Strategy urged the survey’s Technical Review Panel to add this question.

Data collected from this question could change how the public and government understand the needs of today’s college students, and can be used to improve how our country educates and supports the next generation.

CfH leaders in L.A discuss the Campus Hunger Project at a workshop led by CfH and MAZON: A Jewish Response to Hunger staff.
CfH leaders in L.A discuss the Campus Hunger Project at a workshop led by CfH and MAZON: A Jewish Response to Hunger staff.

This month, 24 CfH leaders from Los Angeles and San Francisco area chapters participated in advocacy workshops about campus hunger. The workshops included discussions about how colleges communicate with students about food assistance resources and a presentation by staff from MAZON: A Jewish Response to Hunger on potential policy responses.

As the semester winds down, CfH leaders are busier than ever. In the past two weeks, CfH leaders at Berkeley, SUNY Binghamton, and Occidental College completed three campus interviews and CfH at USC and UCLA pledged to support the Campus Hunger Project.

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