Are college meal plans to blame for campus hunger?

At Virginia Tech University, the cheapest meal plan option for students living on campus is $1,674, which equals about 10 meals a week. At Brown University, a meal plan that provides 7 meals a week for the entire academic year costs nearly $4,000.

It’s not news to us that meal plans range in cost and the number of meals provided. What is surprising to learn is that being enrolled in a meal plan does not eliminate the threat of food insecurity. In a recent survey of 26 four-year colleges and universities, 43% of students with meal plans still experienced food insecurity.

It’s common for colleges to require first year students who live on-campus to purchase meal plans. For many freshmen, living together and going to the dining hall with their peers is a formative part of their social lives. Requiring students to buy meal plans, is of course, great for colleges because housing and meal plans generate revenue.

Today, only 13% of undergraduates live on campus. This seems like a small number, but we can’t ignore that even seemingly “traditional” college students can include students who carefully ration out meals each week, run out of dining points, and turn to friends for help.

Innovative solutions for helping these students have emerged in the past few years. Check out the organization Swipe Out Hunger, which has established systems for students to donate leftover or extra dining points to other students who need them. Systems like theirs provide immediate food assistance to needy students right away. The Campus Hunger Project aims to spread awareness of resources like Swipe’s that students can turn to for help, and longer-term, to advocate for policies that don’t force students to choose between a college degree and their basic needs.
Way to go CfH at Stanford and CfH at Occidental! Two student leaders from these chapters conducted campus interviews with an Assistant Dean and Director of Financial Aid.

Other big news: 27 CfH student leaders are gathering in LA and the Bay Area this November to participate in workshops about the Campus Hunger Project led by CfH and MAZON: A Jewish Response to Hunger staff.

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