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Challah News

Learning from Campus Hunger Project

Since the Campus Hunger Project launched this summer, 32 chapters and counting have pledged to participate in the Campus Hunger Project, and our student volunteers have conducted 23 interviews of campus administrators to understand if and how their campuses support those in need. Sumner Schwartz, a junior and Challah for Hunger chapter treasurer at Occidental College, has been very active in the Campus Hunger Project:

Taking part in the Campus Hunger Project has been an eye-opening experience. I have learned so much about not only a problem that both my campus community and colleges around the country face but also how to bring about serious change. It’s been really cool interviewing key administrators–like the Director of Financial Aid and the Vice President of Hospitality Services–and coming up with changes that are going to help my fellow Oxy tigers.

…Through CfH I’ve learned ways to not only combat hunger in my community but how to bring about change. I’m really thankful for the strategies they have shown me in dealing with campus administrators and how to organize my community into creating real change. I know I’ll be able to use these tools and strategies in my future endeavors. 

Click here to learn more about the Campus Hunger Project. 

Why does marketing matter?

Nearly 50% of food insecure students in the University of California system wanted, but didn’t receive, information about who to talk to on their campus about not having enough food according to a recent study. Additionally, 45% of food insecure students didn’t receive but wanted to know locations of food pantries.

Marketing matters. Colleges and universities are starting to test out different advertising strategies for resources like campus food pantries and emergency loans. Some schools are comparing the effectiveness of email blasts, text alerts, and sharing information on school websites. Others are training freshman orientation leaders and residence hall staff to talk about food assistance as another important resource, just like academic counseling or the Health Center, for students to know about.

CfH leaders discuss underlying causes of campus hunger.
CfH leaders discuss underlying causes of campus hunger.

Word of mouth is a powerful and direct way for students to learn about available resources, but there are many other ways to reach students who might not feel comfortable turning to their peers, administrators, or professors for help.

What seems to be an emerging consensus among researchers and policymakers is that there is no “one size fits all” solution to supporting food insecure students. Schools can and should take the important step of testing out different modes of communicating with students.

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CfH leaders discuss possible barriers that food insecure students face in getting the support they need.

It takes courage for CfH chapter leaders to interview campus professionals in high positions and ask tough questions about what their schools are doing to help students who are struggling to afford food.

Over the past few months, CfH participants on 33 campuses took their advocacy work to the next level: they held 23 research interviews, launched important dialogues with their peers, listened to passionate speakers and learned more in-depth about campus hunger. We’re proud of our chapters’ hard work and excited to build on their progress next semester. Stay turned for your next update in January 2017!

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The costs of work

Employment rates for recent college graduates tend to make news headlines. What we read about less often is how many college students are forced to work while in school because of financial need.

Nearly 60% of college students experiencing food insecurity reported having a paying job, according to a study released last month of over 3,700 students in 12 different states.

These students aren’t just working to earn extra spending money. This data provides more proof that a traditional solution for financing college tuition – getting a job – isn’t sufficiently meeting the needs of millions of students today.

Nationally, over three quarters of college students work while in school. This wasn’t always the case. Between the early 1970s and 2000s, the proportion of students combining school and work more than doubled from 12% to 28%. This is in some part because the proportion of high school graduates going to college jumped from 31% to 55%.

Time is valuable. If students have to work to try and cover their basic needs and sometimes even their family’s needs, that means they have less time and energy for class and studying.

In the past two weeks, CfH leaders at University of Pittsburgh and SUNY Binghamton held campus interviews with a Student Affairs administrator and a University President. The Student Planning Team for the Campus Hunger Project has started to wrap up their outreach work for the semester and plan ahead for the spring.

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Our goal is to expand our network to 100 active chapters by the end of the 2016-2017 school year and you can help make this possible!